(One of) My 2019 Reading Challenges

Hi everyone! Hope you enjoyed 2018’s Holiday Romance Month. I had fun compiling the list of books to feature and sharing them with you. I feel it’s a great way to end the year and I hope you feel the same. If you missed any of those posts, you can find the entire list HERE and just for fun, here’s the list from 2017, as well.

With the holidays coming to a close and life getting slightly less hectic, it’s the time of year when reading goals are set. However, I don’t normally set reading goals for myself. I don’t count my Goodreads “goal”. That’s just a number that is easily accomplished if you read picture books and short stories. We’re not kidding anyone with setting 200 as a goal. I do it often. (I set it at 50 or so this year just to try something new.)

For 2019 I want to try something different. Well, if you’re a long-time reader this won’t seem too different. Back in 2014 I basically set this same challenge for myself (Click HERE and HERE to see that mess). I want to read at least two classic novels this year. This doesn’t seem like a hard challenge, but I’m a reluctant classics reader. Most of the ones I’ve read were audiobooks. It’s not cheating or anything. Audio makes it easier to get passed outdated language and long drawn out boring parts. It’s been a great help in the past. Not this time! This time I want to read the text. I want it to be a challenge.

What I need from you, friendly neighborhood readers are recommendations. I’d like to read classics from two vague categories: “regular classic” and “modern classic”. I won’t get more specific since everyone will think differently about those terms. I don’t even know how I’d define them (maybe pre-1920 and 1950-1990? I don’t know).

Please comment on this post, message me on Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads (message, not recommendation please), or Instagram. Or send me a message through the blog’s contact form. And please, without spoilers, help sell the book to me. I don’t want just a list of books. I’d like to feel compelled to read them based on other reader’s opinions. You can see which books I’ve read and haven’t read by searching through my Goodreads shelf.

Story Time Friday: Prose Verse Babel returns for #NationalPoetryMonth

Story Time Friday Banner

fancy lineresizePROSE VERSE BABEL IS BACK! After a very long drought of both interest and material, I’m bringing the old series back. It might be the only time for awhile or it might spark the series to kick itself back into gear. That’s all up to you, my loyal readers.

If you don’t know what PVB is, simply put: It’s book spine poetry. It’s poetry written from the titles on a book’s spine. Some people go word for word, but I like to add a little freedom to it. Adding/removing punctuation or a few words as one sees fit. Just no major changes.

You can find all the old PVB posts HERE and two brand new poems for this week’s STF post below. You’ll find more info on how to submit your own on the PVB page, as well. It used to be a fan favorite with many guest poems. Can be fun or serious. Doesn’t even have to be good. Just a poem and something you’d like to share.

As always, enjoy!

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Prose Verse Babel Banner

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Poetry by Robert Zimmermann

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Catherine

Catherine,
warrior of the light,
girl at
war:
unleashed the
art of love.

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The Prophet

Eleanor Rigby,
the prophet,
inside the Kingdom
of the Angel of Darkness.

Speak.
Eat, pray,
love for one more
day. 700 Sundays.

To be perfectly honest…
the book stops here.

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For those who wish to be part of Story Time Friday in the near future, you can send submissions to the email address that I formerly used for review requests (but don’t anymore since I’m retired . . . don’t try to be clever and slip on in 😛 ): miztrebor88@gmail.com. Be sure to use the subject “Story Time Friday Submission” and send your piece as an attachment (.doc/.docx would be best). Any other questions, feel free to comment here or contact me through the blog’s contact form.

Hope to hear from some writers soon!

 

It’s November! Read a #Classic!

Back in October I put out a call for a fun challenge for the month of November. I suggested that we all choose a classic novel to read. If you didn’t see that post yet, you can find it HERE.

Today is the day to start reading folks. It’s now November and the days are getting short, cold, and perfect to curl up with a great book that may have been written over a hundred years ago.

Do you know which one you’re going to start? Are you still trying to decide? That’s ok too. The day’s over half over and I have a small stack that I’m trying to narrow down, as well. If anyone needs help deciding or wants some suggestions, I’m happy to help. Comment on this post or jump over to my Facebook or Twitter if that’s better for you. You can always email me through the contact form for a more private conversation. And if I can’t help, I can try to point you to the right person.

Before I list out the books on my “maybe” pile, I’ll recap the challenge a quick as I can:

  • Read a classic book in November. What’s a classic? That definition is very broad, so whatever it means to you is fine. For me, I’m trying to choose a book pre-1923. Those are in the public domain and easy to obtain. They’re also the biggest chunk of the “Literary Cannon” (read that as: Dead White Dudes, with some Dead White Women). But really, anything not too recent and something beloved by many is a good choice.
  • Write a review/reaction post. At the end of the month (November 24th) everyone joining in the challenge will post what they thought about the book and anything else they want to write about the experience of reading a classic. I’d also like everyone to email a link to the post to me a few days before the 24th. Then I’ll send these links out to everyone so we can put the links in our own posts. I want this to be a sharing type thing and get readers jumping around to many different blogs.
  • Have fun. This challenge is meant to broaden our reading if classics aren’t exactly our thing, or to at least try a new author we might have overlooked before. It’s not meant to be a chore though. If a book isn’t working for you, feel free to move on to another. If you read one fast, you can read a second (or third, etc.)  That may make for a better post at the end of the month anyway. Just try to enjoy yourself. No one’s going to be policing you and you can also back out at any time.

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That’s a picture of my choices. Still not sure which I’m in the mood to read though.

  • We by Eugene Zamiatin – This is one that I feel I should really choose. It shouldn’t take me too long to read and I think I’ll enjoy it. I ordered it earlier this year after reading up on it, but one thing lead to another and I didn’t start it yet. If I read this, I’ll need to pick a second though. It won’t last me all month.
  • The Master of Ballantrae and Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson – I’ve read Treasure Island, Jekyll and Hyde, and Olalla, but not much of RLS’s other work. These two look good to add a little action and adventure to my reading and with classics I haven’t run into that much in the past.
  • Looking Backward by Edward Bellamy –  I enjoy H.G. Wells work, so I didn’t want to read him this month. Try something new right? Bellamy’s another early sci-fi author I discovered while looking into the early days of the genre. This one caught my attention and it’d be fun seeing what the “future” was like for an author in the late 1800’s.
  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte – No, I haven’t read Charlotte yet. I read her sister Emily though, as you may have seen early in the year. I have higher hopes of enjoying this one over Wuthering Heights…but I may not choose this one this time around. We’ll see.
  • Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs – How many people have read Tarzan? I don’t think I know anyone, at least no one who I’ve spoken about the books with. Seems like one of those characters we know from film and Disney more than anything else. I’ve wondered what he’s like in original form.
  • Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen – Yes, I’ve read Pride and Prejudice. And now, it really wasn’t my cup of tea. But, I haven’t written off Austen just yet. I’m sure I have a place for her in my reading life, I just need to give her a few more tries. Through some help from Austen fans, this seems to be a good choice for my next try. And by the way, Emma will likely be my last Austen if anyone wanted to put a list together.
  • The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton – I added this one to the list only an hour or so ago after after talking with Justin Bogdanovitch over on my Facebook page about Wharton’s work. I’ve read Ethan Frome and The Glimpses of the Moon, but it’s been awhile since I’ve read her. I feel I should give her another go soon. With this book being her Pulitzer winner…and it being the first time a woman won the prize…it’d be a good choice to expand my reading of Pulitzer winners, classic female authors, and Wharton in general.

What book do you think I should choose from these? Your input will be considered, though ultimately it’ll come down to whether or not the book grabs me in a few pages…unless they all fail, then I’ll have to try harder with them all.

Ok, let’s do this people! Let’s all grab out books and start the challenge!

Happy Reading!

#Review (sorta): Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte

Wuthering HeightsTitle: Wuthering Heights
Author: Emily Brontë
Rating: 3/5 stars

“Wuthering Heights is the only novel of Emily Brontë, who died a year after its publication, at the age of thirty. A brooding Yorkshire tale of a love that is stronger than death, it is also a fierce vision of metaphysical passion, in which heaven and hell, nature and society, and dynamic and passive forces are powerfully juxtaposed. Unique, mystical, with a timeless appeal, it has become a classic in English literature.” description from the back of my book…not Goodreads, this time 😉

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Warning, if you were hoping for one of my “well-thought out”, organized, (almost) non-rambly, informative, and spoiler-free reviews…this isn’t one of them. I took on the challenge of reading a reader voted classic in the month of May. I started on May 3rd and FINALLY finished on May 30th. Since it’s a classic, I feel that my normal reviewing would be pointless and redundant of many reviewers over the 150+ years.

This will be one of those rare times  I’ll pull apart a book, bash it, mash it, chew it up and try to flatten it back out again to have something good to say about it. We’ll see how it turns out in the end.

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I think to start off, I should mention that I had a few friends rereading this book while I read it for the first time. One of them even took the time to write up her own sort of review. I’d like to mention that early on so I don’t look too bad for what I’m about to say. Also, I think she addresses things that I agree with. This is especially the case with her list of characters. So, if you’d like to read that, here’s Sarah’s review.

As I said, I address with what Sarah said about the characters. They were whiny. They were annoying. At least Edgar wasn’t exactly a bad guy. He was just too proper and weak to stick up for his family like should have been done. And Hindley, I don’t even get why he has so much hatred for Heathcliff from an early age. His father seemed to be a man who’d have taught his children to accept people as family. He really went about things the wrong way and shaped the entire book on his being a dick to Heathcliff. It just seemed like an excuse of “he’s just being a boy, jealous of this intrusion to the family” was a bit much. Mr. Earnshaw surely would have been treating them all equally if there was no conflict to make Heathcliff look better.

While we’re on characters, I’d like to point out that Linton was so fucking annoying. First, who names their kid Linton when their maiden name was LINTON? If Heathcliff hadn’t married Isabella Linton to make her Isabella Heathcliff, then her son would be Linton Linton. Enough said. But also with him, he was so weak, sickly, and easily manipulated. Just a puppet. But for a puppet he was the whiniest piece of shit I’ve ever read in a book. A close second in whininess is Catherine the first (yes, there are TWO of them in the book…way to be creative on names AGAIN Brontë). But I won’t get stuck on those traits.

There’s supposedly romance between Heathcliff and Catherine. I saw it, then it was shattered. Then I almost saw it again, just to have myself seem mistaken. Catherine is an inconsiderate bitch. Yes, I said it. I’m just going to be blunt. As this was written, there really isn’t much of anything romantic between the two characters (or any characters in the entire book until the young ones at the end get together). I didn’t see the reason Heathcliff was so glued to Catherine for so long. She pushed and pushed and he still stayed around like a lost puppy. Even when he went away for years because he overheard her saying she didn’t want him, he came back a “very rich” man for HER. She didn’t want him. I don’t care what that drama queen tried to make the reader believe with her raving fever inducing fits. (And who gets sick just from talking too much? The people in this book got sick for nothing, all too often. Linton’s the only one to have an excuse for being sick all the time.)

What’s left here? I went over my annoyance of the characters. The weak health. Well, there’s so much I could say. I picked it apart a lot already. Here’s a BIG issue I had, and Sarah seems to have had it too. The entire book is framed within the notion that a Mr. Lockwood has taken up residence in Thrushcross Grange and is the first narrator in the book. It’s not until a few chapters in that he coerced Nelly to sit for HOURS with him, until something like 1am, telling him the story that we really opened up the book to read. So my advice: Brontë, hire an editor. Cut Lockwood altogether. There’s absolutely NO need to have created him. The book would have been a better read for me if he hadn’t been in the picture. He’s the reason I ranted about the book being wordy and a bunch of shit from the beginning. Nelly was a MUCH better narrator and used her language economically by saying what needed to be said (for the most part) without dwelling on everything else that I’ve already forgotten.

Does it seem like I hated this book? Well, I did give it THREE stars, so I wouldn’t say that’s hatred. I didn’t like it much, but I did have things I enjoyed, despite all that. I DID like Heathcliff in ways. I DID appreciate the story that Brontë tried writing. And I am a MODERN reader. I think I, especially, have to keep that in mind when reading any classic. Many things can be lost on a reader 150+ years in the future. Culture is one of them. Was it legal to lock people in your house to force them to marry your son? Also, how could then not unlock the doors from the INSIDE of the house? Did locks really work that way back then? (I’m still baffled at the issues I had with doors in the book.) What were the readers of the 1850s enjoying and did they enjoy this? I can’t really tell all that (without doing research that I’d rather not do). So I can’t really call it a bad book. It’s stood the test of time. Heathcliff is basically the ultimate super villain without superpowers, unless we can count his stubbornness as a power. I liked him and hated him. I think we should have seen the years he disappeared. That would have made the story interesting, but instead it’s just a jump in narrative and he doesn’t mention what he did. Luckily, I got a book at my bookstore last year that is an author’s take on those lost years (Heathcliff, by Lin Haire-Sargeant) which I’ll read at some point since I’m interested in that.

I also found it cool that I could compare this book (if extremely slightly) to The Princess Bride, the movie not the book (only because I haven’t read it yet). Substitute Heathcliff for Westley and Catherine for Buttercup. Westley loves the woman who’s above him. Buttercup has an attitude against him (I won’t call her a bitch since Catherine’s taken the bitch card from everyone in this review and Buttercup isn’t very bad at all). Westley goes away but stays in love with Buttercup. Buttercup is set to marry a rich man she doesn’t want to marry. Westley comes back (as the Dread Pirate Roberts) a changed/rich man worthy of her heart. The difference here: Catherine doesn’t deserve Heathcliff’s love at this point, nor do I think Heathcliff should get his way either. He’s fucking EVIL and needs someone to rewire his brain. On the other hand, Westley and Buttercup do deserve each other and that’s a happily ever after, blah, blah.

Conclusion since I’ve ranted for too long: I wasn’t looking for a happily ever after. I wasn’t looking for a romantic romp across the moors. I was only looking for a book that’s not overwritten, had at least a FEW characters I could feel sympathy towards, motivations that weren’t just told (I did feel there was a lot of telling, not showing, in this book…big issue for me). Basically something I could finish and say “*sigh* wasn’t bad. I can see why people like it.” Sadly, I can’t see why people like it as much as they do. I can see why people might like it partially, but to the extent that some do. I know in saying that, I’m “pointing a finger” at fans and some friends. I’m not saying you’re wrong and I value your opinion. That statement and this review as a whole is not meant as an insult 🙂 We can all take what we can out of books. Normally I can see both sides. This is an enigma to me. I think maybe I have some of Sarah’s thoughts, yet again, on my feelings toward it. To quote her from her final paragraph: “I think this book will always sit uneasily with me.” I’m a bit uneasy. I don’t have a full grasp on my feelings toward it since I know I probably liked it slightly more than it seems in this post. Three stars I gave it, and three stars it’ll stay…does anyone think that Charlotte’s books are any better? I have a few of those on my shelf too.

P.S. – My copy of Wuthering Heights has “RL8, IL age 14 and up” typed on the copyright page. I’m 25. I’ll be 26 in October. The fact that I had to give up reading this book before the halfway mark and turned to audio makes me feel like a reading failure if this was really listed as a book 14 year olds could read and understand.

P.S.S. – You might recall, I reviewed a book with a similar title last year, Wuthering Nights. It was an erotic retelling of Wuthering Heights. Yes, I enjoyed that one more, and even having read the original now, I still enjoyed the retelling more. Even if I were to remove the erotic additions, I felt the storytelling itself was much better and painted a picture of what was going on. the erotic elements (while some were huge additions) were there to enhance various aspects of the story and characters. It worked better in that form for me and I’m actually surprised to have had this occur. I’m normally a huge advocate for originals.

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About the Author:

Emily Bronte portaitEmily Jane Brontë (30 July 1818 – 19 December 1848) was an English novelist and poet, best remembered for her only novel, Wuthering Heights, now considered a classic of English literature. Emily was the third eldest of the four surviving Brontë siblings, between the youngest Anne and her brother Branwell. She wrote under the pen name Ellis Bell. (From Wikipedia)

Find out more:

My Challenge for May – Wuthering Heights

For the last week of April, I opened up my TBR to my fans. Since April was a month of poetry for National Poetry Month, I wanted to keep up some sort of “theme” for May as well. I decided to ask you all to suggest a classic book that I hadn’t read before, but should. When the results came in (though there were very few results to speak of…help me out more next time folks 😛 ) Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights won the voting!

Now since that was set in motion, it’s May 24th. I have seven days left of the month. How far did I make it in Bronte’s masterpiece? HA, let me allow my Facebook “updates” to tell the tale so far…

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May 3
Since you voted that I should be reading Wuthering Heights this month, who wants to read it with me? We can all read it, and do a little write-up (or full review if you want). Post either when you finish or at the end of the month. Then we can all talk about it like we’re back in school. Who’s up for that? Book report time?

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May 3
WH Update #1Since my readers voted for me to read #WutheringHeights in May, I guess I should get a few chapters in, today. And yes it does look like she has a black eye. It’s not a trick of the light.

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May 3
Wuthering Heights, my first reaction: After 3 pages, I’m beginning to think I don’t have a grasp on the English language. Also, I could rewrite these few pages into ONE paragraph, and I doubt anything would be lost.

ONWARD! (But slowly )

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May 3
Wuthering Heights, update 2: I’m so glad I don’t live back in the 1840-50s. They people should just come out and SAY SOMETHING. They talk about everything BUT what they want to say, mean to say, and end up misunderstanding each other because they can’t just be like “Well, then who is this young man? I’m a stranger to your house and don’t know your family.” Instead, this guy is assuming things, and Heathcliff can’t just be like “He is X. This young woman is Y.” Stop wasting my time with this guessing game shit

(By the way, I’m on page 12. I started reading over an hour ago.)

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May 4
WH Update #2Maybe I can finish chapter two now. The coffee might help…maybe. #wutheringheights

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May 4
I think that’s enough reading for tonight. Read almost 200 pages in 24 hours…not much for some people, but almost twice a normal “hard day of reading” for me. And no, this isn’t another Wuthering Heights update, haha. I’m not THAT into the book yet Planned on reading some of it today, but this book’s better and going to (hopefully) be finished tomorrow, then WH will be opened again.

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May 6
In honor of my reading of Wuthering Heights this month, here’s an entertaining video to watch, rewatch, and share with your friend(s).

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May 6
Here’s another Bronte related video to check out. Makes me wish Linda’s book was real.

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May 9
Wuthering Heights Update: It’s May 9th…and I’ve read an entire three chapters (28 pages in my copy), haha. If you’re reading WH this month along with me, how far are you? Are you enjoying it?

Don’t worry, I think I’ll be reading some more today. I haven’t given up…yet.

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*Yikes…what happened to all the days in here? Well, check the next update, haha.*

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May 20
Wuthering Heights Update: Fuck…on page 75/308 and have roughly 10 days left of the month. Doesn’t seem like a lot to read in 10 days, but remember that today’s the 20th, and I started on the 1st.

I only had to read about 10 pages a day for the month to finish the book. Instead, it’s averaging 3.75/day (though, it’s more like a few chapters one day, then NOTHING for a few days, haha). Now, I have to read 23.3 pages a day to finish. I CAN do it, but the book hasn’t motivated me to

I’ll do my best though.

Let’s get a book for next month! What’re you going to suggest for me, readers? I already told a few people I’m going to read Gone Girl in June…maybe you’ll be kind and suggest that to not oppose them I’ll set up a poll with the books suggested and post it tomorrow.

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May 20
Wuthering Heights Update: I think, after some thinking, I’ll be switching to the audiobook to finish the book. I was doing my best to actually READ this classic because I really only listen to most classics now. They’re easier for me to enjoy and finish that way. I wanted to not do that this time, but I admit defeat.

So…most likely I’ll be starting the audio (from where I left off reading) tomorrow and I should have this book read by the end of the week. I DO foresee a good discussion blog post on this no matter the outcome And in the end, that was part of why I wanted to read a classic this month.

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Where does this all leave me in Wuthering Heights, dear reader? As of typing this, I’m on page 142 of 308 which is Chapter 15 of 34 (just under halfway in the book). I have a week left in the month and, as you saw in the updates, switched to audio. The reading is obviously going faster, but my interest still hasn’t grown any. I WILL finish this book and at the end, I’ll be posting a review of sorts. But be warned, it will be spoilery and not exactly a review. I’ll most likely be picking it apart and discussing what wasn’t working for me, as well as comparing it to the erotic retelling I read last year by I.J. Miller, Wuthering Nights since it’s really the only thing I can compare this too and I think it’s one of the only reasons I didn’t just put WH down after the first few days.

I know it should get “better” soon, but maybe it won’t. We’ll have to see. I know many of my fans and fellow authors have loved the book, even calling it one of their favorites. I’m sure this will help make my “review” of the book a lively discussion in the comments on that post.

Until then, happy reading!

P.S. – Yes, I’ve been harsh on the book and I know it was written a long time ago with different customs, styles of writing, etc. My approach to this is as a modern reader who’s still trying to get a grasp on what made these books classics and transcendent of time. So far this one’s not helping its case. Plus, I like adding a little humor into my “reviews” when I can. Much easier to do when the author’s been dead for a couple hundred years (less than 200? I should look that up).

2013 #Review Recap – Wuthering Nights, by @Heathcliffian

2013 Recap

2013 is winding down, but it’s not over just yet. Last week, I brought back reviews from some of my favorite books of 2012. Instead of just posting my favorite books of 2013 in one post in January (which I’ll do as well), I figured I’d fill up the rest of 2013 by recapping some of my favorite reviews from the year. There are ten days left, and that means out of the 260+ books and stories that I’ve read this year, you’ll get a preview of what my favorites list will look like.

First up in this series of 2013 recapped reviews is a review of a classic with an erotic twist. I.J. Miller has taken the classic novel Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë, and explored the erotic side of its characters. While I may not be very well-versed in the classics, (I’m getting to them though, in time,) this book by Miller caught my interest. There might be some readers who don’t think a classic should be touched, and I have that feeling at times too, but in the end, I feel that Wuthering Nights turned out to be a great read. It’s also gotten me to throw Wuthering Heights  a bit higher on my towering TBR.

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Wuthering Nights

Original post

Title: Wuthering Nights
Author: I.J. Miller (and Emily Brontë)
Rating: 4/5 Stars

“Romantics everywhere have been enthralled by Emily Bronte’s classic novel of the tragic love between beautiful, spirited Catherine Earnshaw and dark, brooding Heathcliff. The restrained desire between these two star-crossed lovers has always smoldered on the page. And now it ignites into an uncontrollable blaze.

In WUTHERING NIGHTS, writer I.J. Miller reimagines this timeless story to reveal the passion between Catherine and Heathcliff–in all its forbidden glory.

Set against the stark, raw beauty of the English moors, Heathcliff, an abandoned orphan, recognizes his soulmate in wild, impulsive Catherine, the only woman who can tame his self-destructive nature. And Catherine cannot deny the all-consuming desire she feels for him, despite his low birth. Together they engage in a fiery affair–one that will possess them, enslave them, and change their destinies forever…” (description from Goodreads)

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When I saw the title of this one, and that it was an erotic retelling of the classic novel, Wuthering Heights, my interest was grabbed. There are a number of authors who go about adding his or her own spin to stories from the literary canon. Wuthering Nights stuck out from many other similar titles out there.

What I found in this novel is that Miller made use of a well-written characters and a story line  but really made it a story of its own. From the start, I was drawn into the setting of the Heights and later on the Grange, as well as the beauty and dangers at the moors. I feel that the way the characters were written in with these settings made it all stick in my mind even better. For a reader like me, a reader who doesn’t read many historical novels due to the language style used, to enjoy the writing of this book, I think that is the icing on the top of this novel. Without the accessibility a more “modern” reader like me found in this novel coupled with writing more true to Brontë herself than Miller’s contemporaries, I may have been less interested through to the end than I was.

Another thing I enjoyed about Wuthering Nights is the way the erotic element was thrown in. It never once felt out-of-place. There were a lot of steamy moments between all of the characters. I liked that there was also a great deal of romance mixed in. This wasn’t a book that was to add “smut” to a classic. Miller worked descriptive sex scenes that only enhanced the emotions between the characters, as well as pushed much of the plot along in Miller’s own way, making this story the author’s own without following a straightforward blueprint set up by Brontë.

If you’re looking to relive a classic or to experience the Wuthering Heights story for the first time, or just looking for an enjoyable erotic novel that’s a little different than others out there, Wuthering Nights might be a novel to check out.

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You can grab a copy of Wuthering Nights from

Ebook:
Amazon | B&N | Kobo

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About the Author:

I have published five literary works of erotic fiction: the novels SEESAW and WHIPPED, the novella CLIMBING THE STAIRS, the short story collection SEX AND LOVE. I have been translated into German and Spanish. WUTHERING NIGHTS, an erotic retelling of Emily Bronte’s WUTHERING HEIGHTS, is due out in January 29, 2013 as an e-book and April 23, 2013 as a trade paperback. Any erotic material is always there to enhance the story, develop the plot, reveal character. Keep smiling!

Find out more:

Review: Wuthering Nights, by I.J. Miller

Title: Wuthering Nights
Author: I.J. Miller (and Emily Brontë)
Rating: 4/5 Stars

“Romantics everywhere have been enthralled by Emily Bronte’s classic novel of the tragic love between beautiful, spirited Catherine Earnshaw and dark, brooding Heathcliff. The restrained desire between these two star-crossed lovers has always smoldered on the page. And now it ignites into an uncontrollable blaze.

In WUTHERING NIGHTS, writer I.J. Miller reimagines this timeless story to reveal the passion between Catherine and Heathcliff–in all its forbidden glory.

Set against the stark, raw beauty of the English moors, Heathcliff, an abandoned orphan, recognizes his soulmate in wild, impulsive Catherine, the only woman who can tame his self-destructive nature. And Catherine cannot deny the all-consuming desire she feels for him, despite his low birth. Together they engage in a fiery affair–one that will possess them, enslave them, and change their destinies forever…” (description from Goodreads)

When I saw the title of this one, and that it was an erotic retelling of the classic novel, Wuthering Heights, my interest was grabbed. There are a number of authors who go about adding his or her own spin to stories from the literary canon. Wuthering Nights stuck out from many other similar titles out there.

What I found in this novel is that Miller made use of a well-written characters and a story line  but really made it a story of its own. From the start, I was drawn into the setting of the Heights and later on the Grange, as well as the beauty and dangers at the moors. I feel that the way the characters were written in with these settings made it all stick in my mind even better. For a reader like me, a reader who doesn’t read many historical novels due to the language style used, to enjoy the writing of this book, I think that is the icing on the top of this novel. Without the accessibility a more “modern” reader like me found in this novel coupled with writing more true to Brontë herself than Miller’s contemporaries, I may have been less interested through to the end than I was.

Another thing I enjoyed about Wuthering Nights is the way the erotic element was thrown in. It never once felt out-of-place. There were a lot of steamy moments between all of the characters. I liked that there was also a great deal of romance mixed in. This wasn’t a book that was to add “smut” to a classic. Miller worked descriptive sex scenes that only enhanced the emotions between the characters, as well as pushed much of the plot along in Miller’s own way, making this story the author’s own without following a straightforward blueprint set up by Brontë.

If you’re looking to relive a classic or to experience the Wuthering Heights story for the first time, or just looking for an enjoyable erotic novel that’s a little different than others out there, Wuthering Nights might be a novel to check out.

You can grab a copy of Wuthering Nights from

Ebook:
Amazon | B&N | Kobo

Print (pre-order only. To be released April 23rd):
Amazon | B&N

About the Author

I have published five literary works of erotic fiction: the novels SEESAW and WHIPPED, the novella CLIMBING THE STAIRS, the short story collection SEX AND LOVE. I have been translated into German and Spanish. WUTHERING NIGHTS, an erotic retelling of Emily Bronte’s WUTHERING HEIGHTS, is due out in January 29, 2013 as an e-book and April 23, 2013 as a trade paperback. Any erotic material is always there to enhance the story, develop the plot, reveal character. Keep smiling!

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